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Côte D'Ivoire

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Sofitel Abidjan Hotel Ivoire
Sofitel Abidjan Hotel Ivoire - dream vacation

Boulevard Hassan II 08 Bp 01, Abidjan

Novotel Abidjan
Novotel Abidjan - dream vacation

10 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, Abidjan

Pullman Abidjan
Pullman Abidjan - dream vacation

1, Avenue Delafosse Prolongée, Abidjan

Ibis Abidjan Marcory
Ibis Abidjan Marcory - dream vacation

Boulevard Valéry Giscard d\'Estaing 15 BP 594, Abidjan

Onomo Abidjan Airport
Onomo Abidjan Airport - dream vacation

Boulevard de l\'Aeroport, Abidjan

Villa Anakao
Villa Anakao - dream vacation

2 Plateaux/ Attoban - Rue L151, Abidjan

Hotel Tiama
Hotel Tiama - dream vacation

Boulevard de la République, Abidjan

Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) is a country in West Africa. It has a southerly facing North Atlantic Ocean coast, and is surrounded by Ghana to the east, Liberia to the west, Guinea to the northwest, Mali to the north, and Burkina Faso to the northeast.

Regions

Cities

  • Abidjan - Remains the administrative centre and other countries maintain their embassies there.
  • Korhogo - Rebel HQ; otherwise idyllic, bursts with commerce during Feb - May because of flowing cotton and cashew trade.
  • Aboisso - Important mile stone on the route connecting Abidjan and Ghana trade route
  • Bouaké - the second largest city
  • Dabou
  • San Pedro - the second port city
  • Yamoussoukro - Although it has been the official capital since 1983, it is not the administrative centre.
  • Grand-Bassam - A coastal town full of colonial charm, often a retreat for local Ivorians seeking to escape the city life of Abidjan on the weekends.

Other destinations

Three National Parks are on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

  • Taï National Park
  • Comoe National Park
  • Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve

Understand

History

Côte d'Ivoire was home to several states including the Kong Empire, Gyaaman, Baoulé, and the Sanwi until it was colonised by the French in the late 19th century.

Close ties to France since independence in 1960, the development of cocoa production for export, and foreign investment made Côte d'Ivoire one of the most prosperous of the tropical African states, but did not protect it from political turmoil.

In December 1999, a military coup - the first ever in Côte d'Ivoire's history - overthrew the government. Junta leader Robert Guei blatantly rigged elections held in late 1999 and declared himself the winner. Popular protest forced him to step aside and brought runner-up Laurent Gbagbo into liberation. Ivorian dissidents and disaffected members of the military launched a failed coup attempt in September 2002. Rebel forces claimed the northern half of the country, and in January 2003 were granted ministerial positions in a unity government under the auspices of the Linas-Marcoussis Peace Accord. President Gbagbo and rebel forces resumed implementation of the peace accord in December 2003 after a three-month stalemate, but issues that sparked the civil war, such as land reform and grounds for citizenship, remain unresolved.

The northern government has yet to exert control over the northern regions and tensions remain high between Gbagbo and opposition leaders. Several thousand French and West African troops, and a moderately-sized United Nations contingent, remain in Côte d'Ivoire to maintain peace and facilitate the disarmament, demobilization, and rehabilitation process.

Elections were finally held in 2010. The first round of elections were held peacefully, and widely hailed as free and fair. Runoffs were held 28 November 2010, after being delayed one week from the original date of 21 Nov. Laurent Gbagbo, as president, ran against former Prime Minister Alassane Ouattara. On 2 Dec, the Electoral Commission declared that Ouattara had won the election by a margin of 54% to 46%. The majority of the rest of the world's governments supported that declaration, but the Gbagbo-aligned Constitutional Council rejected it and then announced that country's borders had been sealed. An Ivorian military spokesman said, "The air, land and sea border of the country are closed to all movement of people and goods."

There has been an armed insurgency ever since, with pro-Ouattara forces on the one side and pro-Gbagbo forces on the other. By 1 Apr 2011, pro-Ouattara forces had penetrated Abidjan and street-level combat between the two sides was occurring. Most governments are still advising their citizens against travel to the country.

Climate

Tropical along coast, semiarid in far north; three seasons - warm and dry (Nov-Mar), hot and dry (Mar-May), hot and wet (Jun-Oct). The coast has heavy surf and no natural harbours; during the rainy season torrential flooding is possible.

Terrain

Mostly flat to undulating plains with mountains in the northwest. Most of the inhabitants live along the sandy coastal region. Apart from the capital area, the forested interior is sparsely populated. The highest point is Mont Nimba at 1,752 m.

People

Côte d'Ivoire has more than 60 ethnic groups but the Baoule are the largest ethnic group.

Get in

Visa

All non-CEFA citizens visiting Côte d'Ivoire must obtain a visa before arrival. The process is on-line at the Official website for visas.

By plane

The Felix-Houphouet Boigny International Airport has daily scheduled flights to and from Paris with Air France and Brussels with Brussels airlines. There are also regular flights to other West-African capitals. The airport is a modern facility and increased security has shaken its old reputation as a place for travellers to be ripped off.

By train

The train journey between Abidjan and Ougadougou cuts through rebel territory and should not be attempted by foreign travellers.

By car

It is ill advised to try to enter Côte d'Ivoire from Guinea, Liberia, Mali, or Burkina Faso. The Ghanaian border is fairly secure. If you enter at Elubo, you can easily catch a shared taxi to Aboisso and then a bus to Abidjan. There are about ten military check-points between the border and Abidjan so have your documents ready. If you do not have proper documentation of your inoculations at the border you will be forced to pay a small fine and they will give you an injection at an on-site clinic.

By bus

Buses run daily between Abidjan and Accra. The service is offered alternating between the STC (Ghana) and its Ivorian equivalent.

Get around

Inter-city travel in Côte d'Ivoire is usually more comfortable than travel in neighbouring African countries. The roads are generally in good condition and the bus service is relatively modern. The downside is the very frequent military check-points which add hours to a trip. Though the stops are a hassle, Ivorian soldiers tend to be pretty professional and don't hassle non-French western travellers. Soldiers in Ghana, for example, are much more likely to demand a bribe than in Côte d'Ivoire. Most western governments recommend that their citizens steer clear of Côte d'Ivoire. This should be taken particularly seriously by people travelling on French passports. An Ivoirian soldier's attitude towards you will change very quickly when you explain that you are not French.

Travel in Abidjan is the best when you have your own vehicle to travel around. The roads are very good and the traffic rules are obeyed to the T, excepting some taxi drivers who steer everywhere on the road. Lane discipline and traffic lights are followed with rigour.

Taxis are a great and easy way to get around in Abidjan. Just look for an orange coloured car and flag it down. Fares are very affordable: USD2–4 depending on the length of the journey. Always negotiate before you get in the taxi, but overall they are reasonably priced - unlike in Accra.

Talk

The official language is French, but there are 60 native dialects as well. The most widely spoken is Dioula. Other native languages include Hamdunga, Loftus Africanus, Gigala, Oloofid, and Ulam. But one cannot survive without French for longer time duration. And business travellers need French on their tongue to close any small deal.

See

Fine beaches, tourist villages, rainforests and wildlife preserves are the principal attractions of Côte d'Ivoire.

  • Taï National Park has the largest tropical rainforest in West Africa.
  • Comoë National Park is the biggest and best-known national park in Côte d'Ivoire. It has plenty of wildlife including birds, elephants, giraffes, lions, monkeys and antelopes.

Do

Buy

Money

The currency of the country is the West African CFA franc, denoted CFA (ISO currency code: XOF). It's also used by seven other West African countries. It is interchangeable at par with the Central African CFA franc (XAF), which is used by six countries. Both currencies are fixed at a rate of 1 euro = 655.957 CFA francs.

ATMs

Ecobank take Master Card and Visa card at their ATMs in Senegal.

Eat

Good eats are cheap and you can find very good restaurants in Abidjan. You should get a vaccine for Hepatitis A before coming but even street foods are fairly clean. Try the national dishes like "garba", "alloco" and "attiéké". Alloco is simply fried plantains, mostly accompanied by a spicy vegetable sauce and boiled eggs. L'attiéké—grated cassava that look like couscous but taste slightly sour—is often served with grilled fish and vegetables (tomatoes, onions, cucumber) and a must-try. Braised fishes and chickens are also very good and can be found on every corner. The most established chain is Coq Ivoire. When you order, make sure that you let them know whether you want the intestines. You can always ask for extra vegetables, especially avocados, which are amazing during the season. Another speciality is the excellent "shoukouilla" a blend of charbroiled meat! For the ones who are not adventurous you can find the Hamburger House or the French restaurant at the Sofitel Hotel. Kedjenou is a spicy stew and is very popular.

Drink

Travellers from the west might want to take a security detail with them when visiting bars and night clubs. Bidul Bar, Havana Club and others are in Zone 4 or Zone Quatre. If you do go, be aware of prostitutes that will want to talk to you. Other places are in Treicheville and Cocody but you should have private transportation or a cab. If you do drive at night do not stop fully at lights or signs. Be aware of car jackers. Keep a brisk pace so they cannot carjack you.

Sleep

Stay safe

Côte d'Ivoire experiences periodic political unrest and violence in northern regions, and it is recommended to contact your embassy or consult other travellers about the present situation prior to travel inland.

The UK's Foreign and Commonwealth office as well as the US State Department advises against all but essential travel to the western regions of Dix-Huit Montagnes, Haut-Sassandra, Moyen-Cavally and Bas-Sassandra of Côte d'Ivoire at this time.

Most of the crime committed in Abidjan is by unemployed youth. Should you ever feel in danger it would be wise to seek the help of a middle-aged man. This older generation is often very contemptuous of young criminals and will likely help you out if you are being hassled. Generally Ivorians will recognize the dangers to foreigners in their country and will often be very protective of naïve travellers. This is especially true in the Abidjan neighbourhoods of Treichville and Adjame.

On 14th March 2016, militants killed at least 16 people in a gun attack on a Grand Bassam beach resort about 40km from Abidjan. The attack was claimed by al Qaeda(AQIM). Côte d'Ivoire had been previously listed as at risk of attack by militants and security had been tightened.

Stay healthy

HIV/AIDS has once reached epidemic proportions in the country, but has since saw huge improvements with an adult prevalence of 4.7%.

Respect

Although the country was previously referred to in English as "Ivory Coast", the country has requested that it be called "Côte d'Ivoire" (the equivalent in French). Pronouncing it "Coat di-VWAR" is close enough for an English-speaking person.

Connect

Cote d'Ivoire Travel Journal: Perfect Size 100 Page Notebook Diary

CreativeJournals

Lightweight and perfect for traveling, this soft cover notebook journal is ideal for tucking into a full bag or suitcase. The cover is a glossy finish so that you can easily wipe it off (if it ends up covered in something delicious-tasting, or lands in a mud puddle ;) Keep your memories for longer by journalling them in your Cote d'Ivoire travel journal. A nice affordable travel notebook designed with the traveler in mind. This would make a great gift for the traveler in your life. Bon voyage!

The Cote d'Ivoire Travel Journal

Younghusband World Travel Journals

"I don't always design travel journals, but when I do they are the kind of travel journals that people throw parades for." - Cormac Younghusband, The World's Most Legendary Nomad

THE COTE D'IVOIRE TRAVEL JOURNAL has been carefully crafted by the legendary nomad Cormac Younghusband to help make your trip unforgettable, fun and organized—with plenty of room to help spur spontaneity and document new discoveries.

This journal can help you plan, live out and record every stage of your journey to Cote d'Ivoire—from pre-trip, to getting there, to being there, to getting home, and afterwards.

"Cote d'Ivoire food is among the world's finest. They do this thing with the thing!" - Cormac Younghusband, The World's Most Legendary Nomad

The first part of the journal is for PRE-TRIP PLANNING and contains sections for important information, a page to write about what inspired you to make the trip, a page to write about the who, where, what, when, how of the journey, a page to make note of your travel companions, a number of pages to organize your travel research.* Plus, you will find sections for drafting an itinerary and keeping a journey to-do checklist.

The second part of the journal deals with GETTING THERE, containing sections to describe getting there and arriving.

The third part of the journal is all about BEING THERE. There are sections for: tracking the stuff you buy and for your daily adventures there are 50 two-page daily records to keep notes on: day #, date, weather, places visited, what happened today + thoughts on what happened, the highlight of the day and extensive notes (with a handy reminder list of things to write about). Because there are about 21,952,093 people in Cote d'Ivoire, there's also a section to record the names and contact info of the people you meet along the way.

The fourth part of the journal is for GETTING HOME, that fateful day you depart and the days that follow. There are sections for describing your departure, for making your own top 10 highlights lists, a country radar to help you create a signature review of the country, and an afterwards where you can sum up the meaning of your trip.

When a trip is over, Cormac Younghusband recommends you start planning your NEXT TRIP. To help, there is a section where you can make a travel wish list.

Also included is a COUNTRY BRIEF to give you important info on the destination and a MAP to give you an idea of the lay of the land. Plus, at the back of the book there are sections for: generic packing ideas, measures and conversions, and pages for notes, sketches, maps and such

"Find a place in the world you haven't been, and go there. Keep on trucking, my friends" - Cormac Younghusband, The World's Most Legendary Nomad

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * Research Such As: places to go / explore, places to stay, places to shop / must have souvenirs, cultural / sporting events to attend, historical / religious sites of interest, pubs-bars-places-to-party, beaches / forests / natural wonders to see, parks & gardens to wander through, things to eat and drink / dining experiences, festivals & events to attend, stuff for kids - seniors - and such, experiences to experience, important local customs, etiquette, laws, and such.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

"Why visit Cote d'Ivoire? Because, it's there." - Cormac Younghusband, The World's Most Legendary Nomad

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

WHEREVER YOU'RE GOING, YOUNGHUSBAND WORLD TRAVEL JOURNALS HAS THE PERFECT JOURNAL FOR YOU.

COTE D'IVOIRE Country Studies: A brief, comprehensive study of Cote d'Ivoire

CIA

A brief yet detailed report on the country of Cote d'Ivoire with updated information on the map, flag, history, people, economics, political conditions in government, foreign affairs, and U.S. relations.

Cote d'Ivoire Travel Journal, Pop. 21,952,093 + Me

Dragon Dragon Travel Journals

There is always room for you in Cote d'Ivoire!

Here’s the Dragon Dragon Travel Journal deal.

You wander the world having adventures, and such. Dragon Dragon offers you 200 pages to document your travels, and such. That’s it. Simple. Beautiful. True.

To help keep things organized, we’ve given each journal a unique continent, country or city name.

Wherever you go in this life, a Dragon Dragon Travel Journal can help make the going better and the remembering easier!

Cote D'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Perspective - Orientation Guide and French Cultural Orientation: Colonial, Ethnic Fracture, Yamoussoukro, Abidjan - Geography, History, Military, Religion, Traditions

U.S. Government

This is a professionally-formatted, free flowing ebook reproduction of two unique guides produced by the Department of Defense that provide comprehensive information about all aspects of life in Cote D'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), with a special emphasis on geography, history, the economy, society, security and military matters, religion, traditions, urban and rural life, ethnic groups, crime, the environment, government, holidays, gender issues and much more. CHAPTER 1: GEOGRAPHY * Introduction * Area * Geographic Divisions * The Coastal Lagoon Region * The Forest Belt * The Savanna * Topographic Features * Climate * Major Rivers * The Cavally River * The Sassandra River * The Bandama River * The Comoe River * Major Cities * Yamoussoukro * Abidjan * Bouake * Korhogo * Man * Environmental Issues * Natural Hazards * Chapter 1 Assessment * CHAPTER 2: HISTORY * Introduction * Early History * The French Colonial Period * Independence * Political Liberalization * The Beginnings of Ethnic Fracture * A Country Divided * Recent Events * The 2010 Elections and the Aftermath * Chapter 2 Assessment * CHAPTER 3: ECONOMY * Introduction * Agriculture * Industry * Natural Resources * Services * Trade * Tourism * Banking and Finance * Standard of Living * Outlook * Chapter 3 Assessment * CHAPTER 4: SOCIETY * Introduction * Languages and Ethnic Groups * Akan * Kru * The Voltaics * The Mande * Religion * Islam * Christianity * Indigenous Religions * Gender Issues * Female Genital Mutilation * Violence Against Women * Sexual Discrimination * Cuisine * Traditional Dress * The Arts * Storytelling and Folklore * Music and Dance * Masks * Sports * Chapter 4 Assessment * CHAPTER 5: SECURITY * Introduction * The Prospects for National Reconciliation * U.S.-Ivoirian Relations * Relations with Neighboring Countries * Burkina Faso * Liberia * Ghana * Guinea * Mali * Military * Issues Affecting Stability * Displaced Persons * Corruption * Poverty * Terrorist Groups * Oil * Outlook * Chapter 5 Assessment * CHAPTER 1: PROFILE * Introduction * Area and Borders * Climate * Topography * Rivers * Cavally * Sassandra * Bandama * Comoe * Major Cities * Yamoussoukro * Abidjan * Bouake * Korhogo * Man * History * Ancient History * The Colonial Era * Independence * Internal Conflict * Recent Events * Media * Economy * Historic * Contemporary * Ethnic Groups * Mande Cultures * Voltaic Cultures * West Atlantic Cultures * East Atlantic Cultures * Chapter 1 Assessment * CHAPTER 2: RELIGION * Introduction * Diverse Faiths * Indigenous Religions * Catholicism * Harrism * Islam * Gender and Religion * Religious Violence * Religion in Public Life * Places of Worship * Basilica of Our Lady of Peace * St. Paul's Cathedral * The Grand Mosque * Religious Holidays * Ramadan * Laylat al-Qadr (Night of Destiny) * Eid al-Fitr (End of Ramadan) * Eid al-Adha (Tabaski) * Easter Monday * Ascension Day * Whit Monday * All Saints' Day * Christmas * Chapter 2 Assessment * CHAPTER 3: TRADITIONS * Introduction * Greetings and Hospitality * Hospitality and Gifts * Eating and Types of Food * Dress Code and Clothing * Non-Religious Holidays and Social Events * Public Holidays * The Bouake Carnival * The Festival of Masks * Fete du Dipri * New Yam Festival * Do's and Don'ts * Chapter 3 Assessment * CHAPTER 4: URBAN LIFE * Introduction * Urban Planning * Abidjan * Yamoussoukro * Housing * Immigrants * Healthcare * War-Related Healthcare * Health Indicators, Diseases, and Hospitals * Education * Historical Background * Post-Independence * Restaurants * Markets * Transportation * Crime * Orphans and Street Children * Human Trafficking * War Crimes * Chapter 4 Assessment * CHAPTER 5: RURAL LIFE * Evolution of the Rural Economy * The Colonial Era * Land Use After Independence * After Houphouet-Boigny * Identity Cards * Chocolate and Child Labor * The History * The Controversy * The Response * Healthcare * Different Ways of Life * Travel in Rural Areas * Chapter 5 Assessment * CHAPTER 6: FAMILY LIFE

Ivory Coast Tour, Côte d'Ivoire tour: Travel, Ivory Coast tourist information

Anderson Jones

Ivory Coast is an African county from Western part of Africa along the costal line of Atlantic Ocean, bordered with, Togo, Liberia, Guinea, by the South, Burkina Faso and Mali by the NorthIvory Coast is a country of extremes; a land of pulsating metropolises and pristine rainforests, vast churches and verdant hills, fancy restaurants and sprawling street stalls. Its reputation might be sullied by the recent civil war, but most areas are now stable and ripe for discovery.Although encountering difficulties in the absence of poaching, and on-farm forest wealth in wildlife and botanical remains important and significant given the security measures taken by the authorities to safeguard the ecological capital. Indeed, Côte d'Ivoire has eight national parks (Azagny-Banco-Como - Islands Ehotilés-Marahoué - Mount Strapped Peco - Tai). At these parks are additional reserves of Divo, Mount Nimba Lamto and animal park Abo Kouamékro.The tourist resort, the whole range of beautiful beaches long about 500 km and the various tourism facilities (accommodation, restaurants, swimming, water skiing) that provide the cities of Grand Bassam and Assini of d ' Assouindé. Towards the west a new road will take you to idyllic protected spaces of the bar Polyplage, Batélébré, Monogaga You are also covered with the History and Culture of Ivory Coast, knowing about the people of that country and their character, how to relate with the local people without exposing to security risk, nevertheless that security information that will guide you through your tour is one of our main menu in this bookOur eBook titled: “Ivory Coast Tour, Cote d’Ivoire tour” is provided for your Guide and information when touring Ivory Coast, you don’t need to get lost or frustrated in any way, and you will have the knowledge of the environment and the places you intend to visit ahead of your visit. Security information is very important when touring a country, our security information is complete to provide you the security once you abide to the instruction given in the book.You may need to read and understand the information related to Ivory Coast tourism and its content without traveling to Ivory Coast in person, you can only achieve this by making this book your tourism informer , you will not have any information to miss out

Orientation Guide to Côte d'Ivoire and the Côte d'Ivoire - French Culture: Religion, Traditions, Family Life, Urban and Rural Populations, Geography, History, Economy, Society and Security

Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC)

Côte d’Ivoire lies in Western Africa and borders the North Atlantic Ocean. It shares borders with five neighbors: Liberia, Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, and Ghana. Its southern-facing coastline is approximately 500 km (311 mi) north of the equator. Although little of its ancient history can be substantiated, there is evidence that a Neolithic culture existed. Ivoirian people first came into contact with the French in the 17th century when missionaries landed at Assini in present-day Côte d’Ivoire. French colonial rule lasted from 1893 until 1960. Internationally known as Côte d’Ivoire (a name derived from the 17th-century ivory trade), the nation officially became the République de Côte d’Ivoire in 1986.During its first three decades of independence, Côte d’Ivoire was associated with religious and ethnic harmony as well as integration into the world economy. The fast pace of growth from 1960 into the early 1980s was called the “Ivoirian miracle.” Over the following two decades, accumulated resource depletion and declining productivity turned the miracle into stagnation. A 1999 coup eventually led to a division of the country in 2002 and to years of violent conflict, largely between the predominantly Muslim north and the Christian south. Long-delayed elections, held in October 2010, delivered a measure of stability, but dissension remains.This book, produced by Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC), provides comprehensive information about Côte d’Ivoire and the Côte d’Ivoire - French Culture. Chapter topics include religion, traditions, family life and differences in the lifestyles of urban and rural populations as well as detailed discussion of geography, history and their economy, form of government, society and security and much more.105 pages; dozens of photos, illustration and charts in full color.This is a Print Replica that maintains the formatting and layout of the original edition and offers many of the advantages of standard Kindle books.

Cote D'Ivoire Country Study Guide (World Country Study Guide Library)

International Business Publications

Geography, history, people, language, culture, traditions, economy, government, politics, constitution, places to visit, info for travelers...

Exercise a high degree of caution; see also regional advisories.

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The Government of Canada takes the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provides credible and timely information in its Travel Advice. In the event of a crisis situation that requires evacuation, the Government of Canada’s policy is to provide safe transportation to the closest safe location. The Government of Canada will assist you in leaving a country or a region as a last resort, when all means of commercial or personal transportation have been exhausted. This service is provided on a cost-recovery basis. Onward travel is at your personal expense. Situations vary from one location to another, and there may be constraints on government resources that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide assistance, particularly in countries or regions where the potential for violent conflict or political instability is high.

The political, economic and security situation in Côte d’Ivoire has improved considerably throughout the country. However. security conditions remain precarious in certain regions.,

Increased threat of attacks and kidnappings

In 2013, the French military assisted the Malian government in efforts to repel armed rebels. Terrorist groups in the region declared their intention to increase attacks and kidnappings targeting Westerners. While the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Mali has been supporting the transitional authorities in stabilizing the region since July 2013, citizens of countries supporting the intervention are still at particular risk, but all travellers should exercise increased vigilance in the region.

Abidjan

The security situation in Abidjan has greatly improved as a result of the more stable political climate. Crime is the primary security threat to travellers. You should maintain a high level of security awareness, particularly in the districts of Treichville, Adjamé, Abobo and Yopougon. Refrain from crossing the main bridges to and from Le Plateau on foot, as pedestrians have been assaulted there, even in broad daylight. Do not walk alone in the Le Plateau business district at night once offices and shops have closed.

Crime

Criminal activity is the main threat to your safety and security in the major urban and densely populated areas. In Abidjan and other cities in the country, you could be the target of petty crime such as pickpocketing or purse snatching. Petty criminals do not hesitate to use force when faced with resistance. Burglaries, break-ins and violent assaults are also frequent, as is car theft. Luxury and four-wheel-drive vehicles are particularly targeted. You should keep your vehicle’s doors locked and the windows up at all times.

Crime increases significantly after dark; be especially careful after sundown and avoid travel late at night.

Highway robbers

Several attacks by armed highway robbers (known as “coupeurs de route”) have taken place on the main road from Yamoussoukro to Korogho as well as on the Abidjan-Yamoussoukro highway in 2013.  Attacks have also been reported in the west of the country, and can occur both during the day and at night. If you are considering travelling by road you should plan your journey carefully and take security precautions.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations and large gatherings have the potential to degenerate into violence or deadly stampedes. Avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Road travel

The road system is relatively good in the southern part of country, and in and around the capital. Elsewhere in Côte d’Ivoire, poorly lit roads and vehicles make driving at night hazardous. Road regulations are not well respected and serious accidents are frequent.

Checkpoints set up by security forces are common, particularly after dark, and vehicles may be searched. You should always carry identification and vehicle documents.

Roadblocks set up by coupeurs de route (highway robbers), who are often armed, are fairly frequent on the country’s main roads, both during the day and at night.

Vehicles stopped in heavy traffic or at roadblocks can be targeted by smash and grab thieves or armed robbers. Doors should be locked and windows shut at all times.

Public transportation

Public transportation is inadequate in Abidjan. Buses are overcrowded and although taxis are available, they are generally in poor condition and their drivers are reckless. If you must absolutely take a taxi, you should either insist that the meter be turned on and pay only the indicated price, or negotiate the fare in advance. There have been incidents of taxi passengers being robbed or assaulted by drivers, so be very cautious. Do not allow the driver to pick up any other passengers on the way to your destination, as this may be a prearranged scheme to attack or rob you.  Avoid using informal taxis (“woro-woros”) and buses (“Gbaka”) on the road in Abidjan.

Air travel

The Abidjan airport is located 17 km away from Abidjan’s business district. Major hotels provide a shuttle service to and from the airport. It is best to make prior arrangements for this service. There is a risk of baggage theft at the airport, so valuables and electronic equipment should be securely locked in hand luggage. Customs authorities X-ray all incoming passenger luggage before it leaves the terminal. Customs and police officials regularly inspect luggage after it has been X-rayed.

Consult our Transportation FAQ in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

Piracy

Pirate attacks occur in coastal waters and, in some cases, farther out at sea. Mariners should take appropriate precautions. For additional information, consult the Live Piracy Report published by the International Maritime Bureau.

General safety information

Avoid showing signs of affluence and carrying large sums of cash. Valuables and bags should be kept out of sight. It is also recommended that you vary your schedules and travel patterns.  

Carry certified photocopies of identification and travel documents.

Fraud

Cases of attempted fraud are frequently reported in this country. See our Overseas Fraud page for more information on scams abroad.

Health

Related Travel Health Notices
Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.
Vaccines

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Vaccines to Consider

You may be at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases while travelling in this country. Talk to your travel health provider about which ones are right for you.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a disease of the liver spread by contaminated food or water. All those travelling to regions with a risk of hepatitis A infection should get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenza occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or through personal contact with unwashed hands. Get the flu shot.

Measles

Measles occurs worldwide but is a common disease in developing countries, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. Measles is a highly contagious disease. Be sure your vaccination against measles is up-to-date regardless of the travel destination.
 

Meningitis

This country is in the African Meningitis Belt, an area where there are many cases of meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease (meningitis) is a serious and sometimes fatal infection of the tissue around the brain and the spinal cord. Travellers who may be at high risk should consider getting vaccinated. High-risk travellers include those living or working with the local population (e.g., health care workers), those travelling to crowded areas or taking part in large gatherings, or those travelling for a longer period of time.

Polio

There is a risk of polio in this country. Be sure that your vaccination against polio is up-to-date.

Rabies

Rabies is a disease that attacks the central nervous system spread to humans through a bite, scratch or lick from a rabid animal. Vaccination should be considered for travellers going to areas where rabies exists and who have a high risk of exposure (i.e., close contact with animals, occupational risk, and children).

Typhoid

Typhoid is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among travellers going to rural areas, visiting friends and relatives, or with weakened immune systems. Travellers visiting regions with typhoid risk, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation should consider getting vaccinated.

Yellow Fever Vaccination

Yellow fever is a disease caused by the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.
Risk
  • There is a risk of yellow fever in this country.
Country Entry Requirement*
  • Proof of yellow fever vaccination is required for travellers from all countries.
Recommendation
  • Vaccination is recommended.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care provider.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites.
Food/Water

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers' diarrhea from consuming contaminated water or food.

In some areas in West Africa, food and water can also carry diseases like cholera, hepatitis A, schistosomiasis and typhoid. Practise safe food and water precautions while travelling in West Africa. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Schistosomiasis

Schistosomiasis is caused by blood flukes (tiny worms) spread to humans through contaminated water. The eggs of the worms can cause stomach illnesses like diarrhea and cramps or urinary problems. Risk is generally low for most travellers. Avoid swimming in contaminated water. There is no vaccine available for schistosomiasis.

Travellers' diarrhea
  • Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.
  • Risk of developing travellers’ diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.
  • The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Insects

Insects and Illness

In some areas in West Africa, certain insects carry and spread diseases like African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, dengue fever, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, malaria, onchocerciasis, Rift Valley feverWest Nile virus and yellow fever.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bites.

Dengue fever
  • Dengue fever occurs in this country. Dengue fever is a viral disease that can cause severe flu-like symptoms. In some cases it leads to dengue haemorrhagic fever, which can be fatal.  
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue bite during the daytime. They breed in standing water and are often found in urban areas.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. There is no vaccine available for dengue fever.

Malaria

Malaria

  • There is a risk of malaria throughout the year in the whole country.
  • Malaria is a serious and occasionally fatal disease that is spread by mosquitoes. There is no vaccine against malaria.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites. This includes covering up, using insect repellent and staying in well-screened air-conditioned accommodations. You may also consider sleeping under an insecticide-treated bednet or pre-treating travel gear with insecticides.
  • See a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic, preferably six weeks before you travel to discuss the benefits of taking antimalarial medication and to determine which one to take.

Animals

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats. Certain infections found in some areas in West Africa, like avian influenza and rabies, can be shared between humans and animals.


Person-to-Person

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your hands often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the flu and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

HIV

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks and impairs the immune system, resulting in a chronic, progressive illness known as AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). 

Practise safe sex while travelling, and don’t share needles, razors, or other objects which could transmit infection.

Remember that HIV can also be spread through the use of unsterile medical equipment during medical and dental procedures, tattooing, body piercing or acupuncture. Diseases can also be spread though blood transfusions and organ transplantation if the blood or organs are not screened for HIV or other blood-borne pathogens.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care provider.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.


Medical services and facilities

Medical services and facilities

Medical facilities and supplies in Abidjan are relatively good but can be expensive. Medical facilities outside large cities are limited. Air evacuation is sometimes the only option in the event of a medical emergency in remote areas.

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kit, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You are subject to local laws. Consult our Arrest and Detention page for more information.

Homosexuality is tolerated but should not be demonstrated in public.

Photographing certain installations such as military sites, government buildings (including radio and television stations), the presidential palace, the airport and the De Gaulle and Houphouet-Boigny bridges in Abidjan is prohibited.

Art objects purchased in Côte d’Ivoire must be accompanied by an export permit provided by the national museum.

An International Driving Permit is recommended.

Money

The currency is the African Financial Community franc (or XOF bank code). Credit cards are accepted by hotels and by some restaurants and shops. Credit card and bank card fraud is common. Traveller's cheques in U.S. dollars or euros and bank cards are accepted only in large banks in Abidjan.

Climate

In the southern coastal region, the rainy seasons occur from May to July and from October to November. In the central and north-central region, the rainy seasons extend from mid-July to mid-October and from mid-March to mid-May. In the north, the rainy season is from July to November, and the harmattan wind blows down from the Sahara between December and February.

Severe rainstorms can cause sudden flooding and landslides, interrupt essential services and impede overland travel. You should exercise caution, monitor local news and weather reports, and follow the advice of local authorities.