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Russian Federation

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Izmailovo Beta Hotel
Izmailovo Beta Hotel - dream vacation

Izmailovskoye Shosse 71 Building 2B, Moscow

SkyPoint Hotel
SkyPoint Hotel - dream vacation

Mezhdunarodnoe Shosse 28B Bld.3, Moscow

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Russian Spacesuits (Springer Praxis Books)

Isaac Abramov

This is the very first ‘inside story’ of a key part of the Soviet manned space programme, detailing the development of Soviet/Russian spacesuits. The authors, as participants in the programme, provide details of events, previously unknown in the West, including their technical development. These space suits were an important part of the many Soviet firsts in the space race – Yuri Gagarin’s flight, Valentina Tereskova, the first woman in space, the first space walk by Alexei Leonov, and the first transfer on orbit from one spacecraft to another.

All previous books on Soviet manned space flights focus on the spacecraft and cosmonaut teams. This book provides a total overview of the successful Soviet/Russian development of space suits and subsequent space walks from Vostok to MIR and ISS.

Have Personality Disorder, Will Rule Russia: An Iconoclastic History by a Recovering Russophile

Jennifer Eremeeva

“I always imagine Russian history,” suggests American writer and veteran expatriate, Jennifer Eremeeva, “on a huge, 3D IMAX screen, surround sound booming with a jumbo bucket of popcorn in your lap and huge blue drink at your side.”  Eremeeva should know: as a former tour guide and Ivy League-educated historian, Eremeeva is adept at making Russia’s complex history both entertaining and digestible for non-academics.  She strolls expertly but lightly through her material, tracing the winning formula for Russia’s effective rulers back to the Tatar Mongols: revealing why Ivan may not have been so Terrible; explaining why Catherine so totally awesome; and asserting that neither Peter the Great nor Stalin would ever tweet anything. Eremeeva encourages us to peek inside Empress Elizabeth’s baroque boudoir; she deconstructs Gorbachev’s curiously-split personality, and shows us exactly where the bodies are buried. Eremeeva’s unique fusion of humor and history, and inimitable writing style brings the riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma that is Russia into hilarious focus in this compact and highly readable guide to thirteen centuries of her history.Fans of Eremeeva’s blogs, columns, and her full-length book, Lenin Lives Next Door: Marriage, Martinis, and Mayhem in Moscow are sure to enjoy this further exploration of Russia’s soft and hilarious underbelly.  For readers embarking on a visit to Russia or an exploration of the country’s rich literature and culture, Have Personality Disorder, Will Rule Russia offers a succinct, informative, and highly entertaining introduction to the country’s complex and expansive history.To download Jennifer Eremeeva’s recommendations for further reading about medieval and imperial Russia, the Romanovs, and current events in the Russian Federation, visit www.jennifereremeeva.com/russianreadinglist.

Dead Mountain: The Untold True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident

Donnie Eichar

In February 1959, a group of nine experienced hikers in the Russian Ural Mountains died mysteriously on an elevation known as Dead Mountain. Eerie aspects of the incident— unsettling and unexplained causes of death, a strange final photograph taken by one of the hikers, and signs of radioactivity—have led to decades of speculation over what really happened. This New York Times bestseller is a gripping work of literary nonfiction delves into the mystery through unprecedented access to the hikers' own journals and photographs, government case files, dozens of interviews, and the author's retracing of the hikers' fateful journey in the Russian winter. A fascinating portrait of the young hikers and a skillful interweaving of their story and the author's investigations, here for the first time is the real story of what happened that night on Dead Mountain.

Russian Parks and Gardens

Peter Hayden

Garden historian Peter Hayden narrates a comprehensive history of the parks and gardens of Russia, spanning a thousand years from the first Byzantine-influenced gardens in the 10th century AD, through to the present day. Along the way, he discusses the influence of Peter the Great, who introduced ideas, plants and designers from Holland, France and Germany to create St Petersburg's Summer Garden and the great formal garden at Peterhof by the Gulf of Finland. The introduction of the English style of landscaping owed much to Catherine the Great, and British gardeners were recruited to lay out parks for the Empress and rich nobles. With a wealth of illustration and with detailed discussion of some of the most beautiful and historically interesting parks and gardens in the world, this pioneering book promises to become an instant classic.

Russia - Culture Smart!: The Essential Guide to Customs & Culture

Anna King

Culture Smart! provides essential information on attitudes, beliefs and behavior in different countries, ensuring that you arrive at your destination aware of basic manners, common courtesies, and sensitive issues. These concise guides tell you what to expect, how to behave, and how to establish a rapport with your hosts. This inside knowledge will enable you to steer clear of embarrassing gaffes and mistakes, feel confident in unfamiliar situations, and develop trust, friendships, and successful business relationships. Culture Smart! offers illuminating insights into the culture and society of a particular country. It will help you to turn your visit-whether on business or for pleasure-into a memorable and enriching experience. Contents include: * customs, values, and traditions * historical, religious, and political background * life at home * leisure, social, and cultural life * eating and drinking * do's, don'ts, and taboos * business practices * communication, spoken and unspoken

Saint Petersburg: Museums, Palaces, and Historic Collections

Cathy Giangrande

Saint Petersburg is, as we all agree, one of the most beautiful cities of Europe; but because of its chequered twentieth century history, it is still one of the least well known. For most of us Saint Petersburg is no more than an acquaintance. We are rill getting to know it and for such a a purpose we need all the help we can lay our hands on. You now hold in your hands the first guide book exclusively devoted to the lesser known museums in the city. It will tell you what they are, where they are, when they are open and what you can expect to find in them. It will open a new world, a Saint Petersburg that lies behind the great palaces and churches; that has seen much, experienced much and suffered much; and that is prepared to reveal its secrets to anyone who takes the trouble to investigate and inquire.

Bears in the Streets: Three Journeys across a Changing Russia

Lisa Dickey

**One of Bustle's 17 of the Best Nonfiction Books Coming in January 2017 and Men's Journal's 7 Best Books of January**"Brilliant, real and readable." ―former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright**A USA Today "New and Noteworthy" Book**Lisa Dickey traveled across the whole of Russia three times―in 1995, 2005 and 2015―making friends in eleven different cities, then coming back again and again to see how their lives had changed. Like the acclaimed British documentary series Seven Up!, she traces the ups and downs of ordinary people’s lives, in the process painting a deeply nuanced portrait of modern Russia.

From the caretakers of a lighthouse in Vladivostok, to the Jewish community of Birobidzhan, to a farmer in Buryatia, to a group of gay friends in Novosibirsk, to a wealthy family in Chelyabinsk, to a rap star in Moscow, Dickey profiles a wide cross-section of people in one of the most fascinating, dynamic and important countries on Earth. Along the way, she explores dramatic changes in everything from technology to social norms, drinks copious amounts of vodka, and learns firsthand how the Russians really feel about Vladimir Putin.

Including powerful photographs of people and places over time, and filled with wacky travel stories, unexpected twists, and keen insights, Bears in the Streets offers an unprecedented on-the-ground view of Russia today.

Behind the Urals: American Worker in Russia's City of Steel (Classics in Russian studies)

John Scott

Behind the Urals, first published in 1942, is a fascinating first-hand account of a young American's journey to Stalin's Soviet Union where he lived and worked for 6 years helping build a massive steel plant in a former wilderness east of the Ural Mountains. The isolated settlement grew into the new city of Magnitogorsk. Author Scott's account remains a classic work on daily life for workers in the Soviet Union of the 1930s. Of interest too are his own experiences: the dangerous working conditions, extreme cold, food shortages, and inadequate housing. During his stay, he meets and weds a young Soviet woman, Masha, and together they have two baby daughters. With the coming of the Stalinist purges, Scott is no longer welcome in Russia, and he and his wife are forced to separate for 3 years (Scott moving to Moscow) while he attempts to secure visas for his family to emigrate to America (he is eventually successful in bringing his family to the U.S.). John Scott, son of Scott Nearing and Nellie Seeds Nearing, was born in 1912, and until his retirement in 1973 was a correspondent for Time magazine. Scott passed away on December 1, 1976. His wife, Maria “Masha” Dikareva Scott died on November 5, 2004.

Exercise a high degree of caution; see also regional advisories.

The decision to travel is your responsibility. You are also responsible for your personal safety abroad. The Government of Canada takes the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provides credible and timely information in its Travel Advice. In the event of a crisis situation that requires evacuation, the Government of Canada’s policy is to provide safe transportation to the closest safe location. The Government of Canada will assist you in leaving a country or a region as a last resort, when all means of commercial or personal transportation have been exhausted. This service is provided on a cost-recovery basis. Onward travel is at your personal expense. Situations vary from one location to another, and there may be constraints on government resources that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide assistance, particularly in countries or regions where the potential for violent conflict or political instability is high.

Republics of Chechnya, Ingushetia and Dagestan (see Advisory)

Despite the end of the Chechen War in 2009, there remains an insurgency in the North Caucasus, during which terrorist attacks are frequent. The security situation is unstable and dangerous. Suicide bombings occur on a regular basis and targeted assassinations have also taken place. Unexploded mines and munitions are widespread. Kidnapping for ransom is also common.

You must obtain special permission from the Ministry of the Interior to enter certain areas of the country.

Republics of Karachai-Cherkessia, Kabardino-Balkaria (including the Mount Elbrus region) and North Ossetia (see Advisory)

Tensions remain high in the border regions with Georgia since the 2008 conflict in South Ossetia, and may affect the security situation in the republics of Karachai-Cherkessia, Kabardino-Balkaria and North Ossetia. Military operations are carried out with little or no notice, and are accompanied by travel restrictions. The border crossings to Georgia and Azerbaijan are subject to frequent, sometimes lengthy closures.

Terrorism

Terrorist incidents have occurred most frequently in the North Caucasus and in Moscow, but may happen throughout Russia.  Exercise caution in public places, particularly on public transport (including subways, railways, airports and buses), and during large gatherings and events. 

On December 29, 2013, an explosive device was detonated inside the main railway station of the city of Volgograd; on December 30, another explosive device was detonated on a public bus in the same city.  These incidents caused deaths and injuries.  Security measures have been reinforced throughout Russia, specifically in the Volgograd region. The Domodedovo International Airport and the Moscow subway system have also been targeted by terrorist attacks

Remain vigilant, monitor local news reports and follow the advice of local authorities.  Authorities perform random identity checks frequently in public places.

Crime

Crime against foreigners is a serious problem. Harassment and attacks are prevalent, especially for foreigners of Asian and African descent. Some victims have died. Foreigners in the areas to which we advise against all travel (see above) are particularly vulnerable. Several journalists and local aid personnel have been killed or kidnapped. Criminals have targeted and destroyed well-marked aid convoys

Exercise extreme caution in crowds and places frequented by skinhead groups, including open markets.

Violent crime is common. Pickpocketing, assaults and robberies occur frequently and are often committed by groups of children and teenagers. Criminals employ various techniques to distract the victims, including luring people to help them. In such situations, walk away quickly. Underground walkways, public transport, tourist sites, restaurants, transport hubs, markets, and hotel rooms and residences (even when occupied and locked are preferred targets. Reduce your risk of being targeted by travelling in groups with reputable tour agencies.

Criminals may also pose as police officers, particularly in St. Petersburg. Real police officers wear a visible personal identification number on their uniforms. Avoid showing signs of affluence and ensure personal belongings, passports and other travel documents are secure at all times. Replacing travel documents and visas is difficult, and could considerably delay your return to Canada.

Cases of drugging followed by robbery and assault have been reported. Do not accept food and drinks from strangers, and do not leave food and drinks unattended in bars, nightclubs or restaurants. Order only bottled drinks in order to minimize risk.

Bogus checkpoints may be set up in rural areas in order to commit robbery.

Traffic police may stop motorists to collect fraudulent cash fines on the spot.

Credit card and automated banking machine (ABM) fraud occurs. Pay careful attention when your cards are being handled by others during payment processing.

Organized crime

Organized criminal groups remain active throughout Russia, especially in large cities. Credit card fraud is one type of activity. Extortion and corruption are common business practices, including among foreign businesses. Criminals demand protection money under threat of serious violence. Report extortion attempts to Russian authorities

Demonstrations

Rallies, protests and demonstrations occur in Russia. They can lead to significant disruptions in traffic and public transportation. Avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Sochi Olympics

The 2014 Winter Olympic Games will be held from February 7 to 23, 2014, in Sochi, followed by the Paralympic Games from March 7 to 16. Events will be held in the resort towns of Adler and Krasnaya Polyana. Any high profile international event is vulnerable to the risk of a terrorist attack. In July 2013, Imarat Kavkaz leader Doku Umarov called on militants to derail the Sochi Olympic Games using any necessary means, and lifted his previous moratorium on actions of militants in Russia outside the North Caucasus. On January 19, 2014, the Ansar Al-Sunna terrorist group took responsibility for the December 2013 attacks on Volgograd (see above) and threatened further attacks if the Olympic games were to take place.

Russian authorities have announced that special security arrangements will be in place at Olympic venues, airports, border crossings and other sensitive areas. Whenever possible, limit your use of public transportation that is not affiliated with the Games. If you must use public buses or trains, be particularly vigilant and remain aware of your surroundings at all times. Russian authorities have also placed special security measures and restrictions on various items and materials, including prescription medications and medical supplies, at Olympic venues. Bring a copy of your prescription and be prepared to show it to officials.

If you are planning to travel outside of Olympic sites, be particularly cautious. There remains an ongoing insurgency in the North Caucasus, located approximately 150 kilometres from Sochi; consult our Advisories against travel to the North Caucasus republics of Chechnya, Ingushetia and Dagestan.

Since January 7, 2014, demonstrations, assemblies, rallies, marches and picketing not associated with the Olympic and Paralympic Games in and around Sochi must be held in places or along routes approved by the Interior Ministry. This order will be in effect until March 21, 2014. This includes the nearby venues of Adler and Krasnaya Polyana. Maintain a high level of personal security awareness at all times and in all places. Avoid demonstrations, monitor local developments and follow the advice of local authorities.

If you are planning to travel to the Games, take sensible precautions. You should make your travel arrangements, including accommodation, transportation and purchase of sporting events tickets, well in advance using genuine and reliable sources.

Transportation

Use only registered taxis and do not share a taxi with strangers. Negotiate the price before getting into a taxi.

Road conditions vary and are often poor outside major cities. Traffic regulations are mostly ignored. Road accidents are common and pedestrians should be particularly careful. In the event of an accident, do not move the vehicle until the police arrive, even if the car is obstructing traffic. Drive only during daylight hours.

When travelling by train, store valuables in a safe place and do not leave the compartment unattended. Lock the door from the inside.

Boat accidents are common due to the overloading and poor maintenance of some vessels. Safety standards differ from those in Canada. Exercise caution and common sense when using marine transportation. Do not board vessels that appear overloaded or unseaworthy.

Consult our Transportation Safety page in order to verify if national airlines meet safety standards.

Fraud

Fraud has been reported by victims developing friendships or romantic relationships over the Internet and becoming entangled in financial issues. Remain vigilant and be aware that neither the Embassy of Canada in Moscow or Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada can help you recover lost funds or property in such cases.

See our Overseas Fraud page for more information on scams abroad.

General safety information

Power outages and shortages occur often throughout Russia.

Emergency services

Dial 01 for fire, 02 for police and 03 for ambulance.

Health

Related Travel Health Notices
Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.
Vaccines

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Vaccines to Consider

You may be at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases while travelling in this country. Talk to your travel health provider about which ones are right for you.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a disease of the liver spread by contaminated food or water. All those travelling to regions with a risk of hepatitis A infection should get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenza occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or through personal contact with unwashed hands. Get the flu shot.

Japanese encephalitis

Japanese encephalitis is a viral infection that can cause swelling of the brain. It is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. Risk is low for most travellers. Vaccination should be considered for those who may be exposed to mosquito bites (e.g., spending time outdoors in rural areas) while travelling in regions with risk of Japanese encephalitis.

Measles

Measles occurs worldwide but is a common disease in developing countries, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. Measles is a highly contagious disease. Be sure your vaccination against measles is up-to-date regardless of the travel destination.
 

Polio

There is a risk of polio in this country. Be sure that your vaccination against polio is up-to-date.

Rabies

Rabies is a disease that attacks the central nervous system spread to humans through a bite, scratch or lick from a rabid animal. Vaccination should be considered for travellers going to areas where rabies exists and who have a high risk of exposure (i.e., close contact with animals, occupational risk, and children).

Tick-borne encephalitis

Tick-borne encephalitis is a viral disease that can cause swelling of the brain. It is spread to humans by the bite of an infected tick. Vaccination should be considered for those who may be exposed to tick bites (e.g., those spending time outdoors in wooded areas) while travelling in regions with risk of tick-borne encephalitis.

Yellow Fever Vaccination

Yellow fever is a disease caused by the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.
Risk
  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.
Country Entry Requirement*
  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.
Recommendation
  • Vaccination is not recommended.
Food/Water

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers' diarrhea from consuming contaminated water or food.

In some areas in Eastern Europe, food and water can also carry diseases like hepatitis A. Practise safe food and water precautions while travelling in Eastern Europe. When in doubt, remember…boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Travellers' diarrhea
  • Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.
  • Risk of developing travellers’ diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.
  • The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Insects

Insects and Illness

In some areas in Eastern Europe, certain insects carry and spread diseases like Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Japanese encephalitis, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease, tick-borne encephalitis, and West Nile virus.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bites.

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever is a viral disease that typically causes fever, bleeding under the skin, and pain. Risk is generally low for most travellers. It is spread to humans though contact with infected animal blood or bodily fluids, or from a tick bite. Protect yourself from tick bites and avoid animals. There is no vaccine available for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.


Malaria

Malaria

There is no risk of malaria in this country.


Animals

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, snakes, rodents, and bats. Certain infections found in Eastern Europe, like rabies, can be shared between humans and animals.


Person-to-Person

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your hands often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the flu and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is an infection caused by bacteria and usually affects the lungs.

For most travellers the risk of tuberculosis is low.

Travellers who may be at high risk while travelling in regions with risk of tuberculosis should discuss pre- and post-travel options with a health care provider.

High-risk travellers include those visiting or working in prisons, refugee camps, homeless shelters, or hospitals, or travellers visiting friends and relatives.


Medical services and facilities

Medical services and facilities

Standards of medical care may differ from those in Canada. A few quality facilities exist in larger cities and usually require cash payment upon admission.

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kit, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You are subject to local laws. Consult our Arrest and Detention page for more information.

An International Driving Permit is recommended.

Illegal or restricted activities

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are strict. Convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines.

There is zero tolerance for drinking and driving.

Although homosexual activity is not illegal in Russia, a federal law has been passed that prohibits public actions that are described as promoting homosexuality and “non-traditional sexual relations”. This law could render any homosexual and pro-homosexual statements punishable. Public actions (including dissemination of information, statements, displays or conspicuous behaviour) that contravene or appear to contravene this law may lead to arrest, the imposition of a fine and deportation.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender travellers, as well as their friends and families, have been targets of harassment and violence.

Taking photos of railways, bridges, dams, airports, train stations, the underground Metro system and all official buildings is prohibited. Incidents have occurred at marketplaces where Canadians have taken photos of market stalls and found themselves remanded to market police. Cameras, film and other equipment may be confiscated, and fines payable in cash on the spot may be imposed. Ask permission before taking photographs.

Identification documents

You may be fined or detained for failing to provide proper documentation to Russian authorities. Carry your original passport (photocopies are not acceptable), entry/exit visa and registered migration card at all times. Failure to provide identification documents could result in heavy fines or a jail sentence.

Traffic police

The traffic police can only stop motorists and impose fines for traffic violations. Although they can also conduct identity checks on pedestrians, they have no authority to impose fines. The same is true of police in the underground Metro systems. Only the special police of the Federal Migration Bureau have the authority to arrest, detain, and impose fines on improperly documented foreigners. If you are stopped in the street and requested to pay a fine, ask to see the officer's name and identification and to contact the Embassy of Canada in Moscow.

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is not legally recognized in Russia. The ability of Canadian officials to provide consular services may be limited.

Men between 18 and 27 years of age may be subject to military service. Seek advice from the nearest Russian embassy or consulate before travelling to Russia.

Consult our publication entitled Dual Citizenship: What You Need to Know for more information.

Importation / exportation

Russia has very strict rules on the importation of medication: certain prescription and over-the-counter drugs that are common in Canada may be prohibited, and large quantities of any medicine will be scrutinized.

The importation and use of electronic equipment are strictly controlled. Foreigners have faced charges of espionage for possessing improperly certified GPS (Global Positioning System) devices, such as those used for geological mapping.

You must obtain a certificate from the Ministry of Culture to export items that appear old (prior to 1945) or that have cultural value. Customs officials may conduct thorough baggage searches and may arrest you if you do not have the necessary certificate.

Contact the nearest Russian embassy or consulate, or consult the Federal Customs Service website prior to departure for up-to-date information on customs requirements.

Money

The currency is the Russian ruble (RUB). It is illegal to pay for goods and services in foreign currency. You can exchange U.S. dollars at any exchange counter. Carry new, crisp bills, as well-worn or used U.S. banknotes may not be accepted. Do not rely on credit cards, travellers’ cheques and bank cards as methods of payment or to obtain cash. Traveller’s cheques can be cashed only at a few locations in Moscow, such as American Express offices. Credit cards and traveller’s cheques are not widely accepted outside Moscow and St. Petersburg. Automated banking machines (ABMs) are common in main cities.

Climate

Parts of Russia are prone to seismic or volcanic activity, such as Chechnya, the Kuril Islands and the Kamchatka Peninsula.

Spring flooding and summer forest fires occur throughout Siberia and parts of western Russia. Heavy rains caused flash floods and landslides in the Krasnodar region in July 2012, killing at least 170 people and injuring more than 320.