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First Methodist Church

First Methodist Church may refer to:

  • First Methodist Church (Lewisville, Arkansas), listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in Lafayette County, Arkansas
  • First Methodist Church of Oviedo, listed on the NRHP in Seminole County, Florida
  • First Methodist Church of St. Petersburg, listed on the NRHP in Pinellas County, Florida
  • First Methodist Church (Moscow, Idaho), listed on the NRHP in Latah County, Idaho
  • First Methodist Church of Batavia, listed on the NRHP in Kane County, Illinois
  • First Methodist Church (Aurora, Indiana), listed on the NRHP in Dearborn County, Indiana
  • First Methodist Church (Rock Rapids, Iowa), listed on the NRHP in Lyon County, Iowa
  • First Methodist Church (Alexandria, Louisiana), listed on the NRHP in Rapides Parish, Louisiana
  • First Methodist Church (Clinton, Massachusetts), listed on the NRHP in Worcester County, Massachusetts
  • First Methodist Church (Brookhaven, Mississippi), listed on the NRHP in Lincoln County, Mississippi
  • First Methodist Church of Greenwood, listed on the NRHP in Leflore County, Mississippi
  • First Methodist Church (Tupelo, Mississippi), listed on the NRHP in Lee County, Mississippi
  • First Methodist Church (Excelsior Springs, Missouri), listed on the NRHP in Clay County, Missouri
  • First Methodist Church of Clovis, listed on the NRHP in Curry County, New Mexico
  • First Methodist Church (Cleveland, Ohio), listed on the NRHP in Cuyahoga County, Ohio
  • First Methodist Church Building (Atoka, Oklahoma), listed on the NRHP in Atoka County, Oklahoma
  • First Methodist Church, Gatlinburg, listed on the NRHP in Sevier County, Tennessee
  • First Methodist Church (McMinnville, Tennessee), listed on the NRHP in Warren County, Tennessee
  • First Methodist Church (Crockett, Texas), listed on the NRHP in Houston County, Texas
  • First Methodist Church (Cuero, Texas), listed on the NRHP in DeWitt County, Texas
  • First Methodist Church (Georgetown, Texas), listed on the NRHP in Williamson County, Texas
  • First Methodist Church (Marshall, Texas), listed on the NRHP in Harrison County, Texas
  • First Methodist Church of Rockwall, listed on the NRHP in Rockwall County, Texas
  • First Methodist Church of Burlington, listed on the NRHP in Chittenden County, Vermont
  • First Methodist Church (Monroe, Wisconsin), listed on the NRHP in Green County, Wisconsin
  • First Methodist Church (Oshkosh, Wisconsin), listed on the NRHP in Winnebago County, Wisconsin
  • First Methodist Church (Waukesha, Wisconsin), listed on the NRHP in Waukesha County, Wisconsin

Shantyboat: A River Way of Life

Harlan Hubbard

Shantyboat is the story of a leisurely journey down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans. For most people such a journey is the stuff that dreams are made of, but for Harlan and Anna Hubbard it became a cherished reality. In the fall of 1944 they built a houseboat, small but neatly accommodated to their needs, on the bank of the Ohio near Cincinnati, and in it after a pause of two years they set out to drift down the river.In their small craft, the Hubbards became one with the flow of the river and its changing weathers. An artist by profession, Harlan Hubbard records with graceful ease the many facets of their life on the river-the panorama of fields and woods, summer gardening, foraging expeditions for nuts and berries, dangers from storms and treacherous currents, the quiet solitude of the mists of early morning. Their life is sustained by the provender of bank and stream, useful things made and found, and mutual aid and wisdom from people met along the journey. It is a life marked by simplicity and independence, strenuous at times, but joyous, with leisure for painting and music, for observation and contemplation.

Shantyboat On The Bayous

Harlan Hubbard

Since the publication of Shantyboat: A River Way of Life in 1953, Harlan Hubbard achieved a wide reputation as a modern-day Thoreau. Not content simply to advocate a life of simplicity and self-sufficiency, Hubbard and his wife Anna in 1944 built with their own hands a houseboat on the banks of the Ohio near Cincinnati and in 1946 set out on a leisurely, five-year journey down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Shantyboat, Hubbard's recounting of their journey to New Orleans, and Payne Hollow: Life on the Fringe of Society, his sequel telling of their life in a corner of rural Kentucky after their return, won him a host of readers.Shantyboat on the Bayous is the middle chapter of the Hubbard saga. It tells of Harlan and Anna's voyage of explorations into the remote reaches of Louisiana. For more than a year after reaching New Orleans, the Hubbards meandered through the lush Cajun country on the Intracoastal Waterway, along Bayou Lafourche, thought the marshes around Avery Island, and finally up the storied Bayou Teche toward the farthest point of navigation. The story of these travels, along with the author's illustrations of the bayou country, offers a portrait of one of the most unusual and least-known regions of our country and of the people who inhabit it. In this book, the Hubbards once again demonstrate their gift for living in simple and eloquent harmony with the land. As Don Wallis notes in his foreword, Shantyboat on the Bayous completes Hubbard's autobiography of "the life he shared with Anna, self-created and self-sustained, difficult and joyful, full of achievement and discovery, diligence, pleasure, and reward."Here is a jewel of a travel book, certain to be treasured by Hubbard's many admirers and discovered by scores of new ones.

Bell County (KY) (Images of America)

Tim Cornett

Bell County is a place steeped in history and imbued with a pioneering spirit. Its favorable location in southeastern Kentucky at the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains makes it the gateway to the Bluegrass State and beyond. Formed just after the Civil War from neighboring Harlan and Knox Counties, the area was explored by famous frontiersmen Dr. Thomas Walker and Daniel Boone, opening the nationís door to the West. From the 1750s until the last footfalls of the pioneers had been heard in the West, thousands trekked across this region. As the land became more accessible, travelers began to settle in this remote area. The discovery of coal, the advent of logging, and the coming of the railroad made Bell County a place to live and prosper, and its residents have always taken pride in their town's humble beginnings. Images of America: Bell County celebrates the region's heritage with vintage images and informative text. Black-and-white photographs culled from a variety of sources highlight the spirit of a remarkable community, where self-made millionaires and peg-legged admirals were among the many unforgettable individuals to call the area home. This photo journal invites readers to rediscover Bell County and its treasures.

Shantyboat Journal

Harlan Hubbard

Harlan and Anna Hubbard, newly married in middle age, build the boat of their dreams and drift down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Harlan is an artist and a writer with a poet's eye for the beauty of the world. Anna is a musician and an elegant master of the arts of graceful living. For seven years (1944-1951) the Hubbards make their home on their little boat, drifting with the river, camping on the land.Together they learn how to create and sustain a self-sufficient way of life that is infinitely fulfilling. It is a "river way of life"―free-flowing, endowed with the love of nature, the discovery of community, the rewards of good work, and the joy of creativity.The journal is a witness to history, embracing the gentle spirit of an America now lost to modern "progress." It is one of the most significant renderings in our literature of a deeply felt sense of place.Out of this journal grew Harlan Hubbard's enduring classic, Shantyboat, and his idyllic Shantyboat on the Bayous. His later Payne Hollow is a Thoreauvian testament to the values embodied in the homesteading life the Hubbards lived for four decades after they completed their epic river journey. Their life together has been praised by Wendell Berry as "one of the finest accomplishments of our time." The Shantyboat Journal reveals its creation.

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