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Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania, 2nd Edition (The Underground Railroad)

William J. Switala

Revised and expanded with recently uncovered information Detailed maps of escape routes and networks Eyewitness accounts of fugitives

Organized in antebellum America to help slaves escape to freedom, the Underground Railroad was cloaked in secrecy and operated at great peril to everyone involved. The system was extremely active in Pennsylvania, with routes running through cities and towns in all parts of the state.

This revised second edition retraces the routes with detailed maps, discusses the large city networks, identifies the houses and sites where escapees found refuge, and records the names of the people who risked their lives to support the operation.

Remembering the Pennsylvania Railroad (America Through Time)

Kenneth C. Springirth

On August 7, 2011, former Pennsylvania Railroad type E8A diesel units No. 5711 and No. 5809 are passing through the borough of Greenville in Mercer County, Pennsylvania on the former Erie Railroad now Norfolk Southern Railway on a rail excursion in this photograph by the author. The Erie and Pittsburgh line of the Pennsylvania Railroad once served Greenville. Kenneth Springirth, with a lifelong interest in rail transportation, has been researching the Pennsylvania Railroad since 1960. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he commuted to Drexel Institute of Technology (now Drexel University) in Philadelphia by trolley car, subway, and sometimes Pennsylvania Railroad commuter train. His father was a trolley car motorman in Philadelphia, and his grandfather was a trolley car motorman in Washington D.C. This book is a photographic essay documenting the Pennsylvania Railroad, which considered itself the standard railroad of the world. Classic scenes of the Pennsylvania Railroad's amazing GG1 electric locomotives operating on the most successful electrification project in the United States are included. This book provides an insight to an extensive railroad system that survives today with the Norfolk Southern Railway owning much of former mainline trackage in Pennsylvania and Amtrak owning the Northeast Corridor plus trackage between Philadelphia and Harrisburg. In addition, there are a variety of regional and shortline railroads that contribute to Remembering the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Pennsylvania Main Line Railroad Stations: Philadelphia to Harrisburg (Images of Rail)

Jim Sundman

In 1857, the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) took over Pennsylvania's Main Line of Public Works, a state-owned railroad and canal system built in the 1830s. Costly to build and maintain, and never attracting the traffic needed to sustain it, the state was eager to let it go. Keeping the rail portion and combining it with its own lines, the PRR ultimately developed a well-built and well-run rail line from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh all while keeping the "main line" moniker. The eastern section between Philadelphia and Harrisburg was especially successful, particularly after the railroad built new communities along the line that were at first summer destinations and later year-round homes for daily commuters. Other towns and cities along the main line had a strong industrial or agricultural base needing rail access, and many of these communities had attractive train stations. Images of America: Pennsylvania Main Line Railroad Stations: Philadelphia to Harrisburg documents many of these passenger stations through vintage photographs and other images. Most are gone, but fortunately some still stand and are in use today.

The Lackawanna Railroad in Northeastern Pennsylvania (Images of Rail)

David Crosby

The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, better known as the Lackawanna Railroad, was organized in 1851 and thrived on the anthracite coal traffic originating from the area surrounding Scranton, Pennsylvania. The company came to operate a network of track between Hoboken, New Jersey, and Buffalo, New York, before becoming part of the Erie Lackawanna Railway in 1960. During the first decade of the 1900s, the railroad underwent a substantial modernization and improvement project, which was documented extensively by company-hired photographers. A century later, these images provide a fascinating insight into the everyday workings of a railroad and its interaction with the communities along its route. Nearly all of the railroad territory covered by this book remains in operation today.

Athens, Sayre, and Waverly (PA) (Images of America)

Bonnie Stacy

With Athens, Sayre, and Waverly, the first pictorial history of the valley, Bonnie Stacy has created a nostalgic look at the picturesque communities where the Susquehanna and the Chemung Rivers flow together. Over 200 rare images from the late 1770s to the present chronicle the proud lumber, canal, and railroad traditions that first drew residents to this bucolic area. From the unique house photographs taken by local photographer M. Louis Gore to the unusual archaeological and historic photographs from the collection of the Tioga Point Museum, these images bring the past to life. In Revolutionary times, Tioga Point was the location of Fort Sullivan. Later, the area was settled by lumbermen, canal workers, and railroaders. Included here are painted portraits of the well-known founders of the settlements in the area, as well as those of everyday people―millworkers, shopkeepers, and bridge builders―who made their marks here and enriched their communities.

Railroads of Pennsylvania

Lorett Treese

"Informative and very satisfying to read." --Library Journal

"For those of you who cannot get enough of railroad history, this book will brighten your day." --Livesteam

Completely revised and updated edition of this best-sellerRegional histories of the great railroads and relics of rail cultureRail stories of the people and events that shaped historyRails-to-Trails paths, tourist attractions, and other traveler informationIncludes 10 maps for easy reference

East Broad Top Railroad (Images of Rail: Pennsylvania)

Kenneth C. Springirth

Chartered in 1856, the East Broad Top Railroad began operating in 1873 through scenic Huntingdon County in south-central Pennsylvania. This well-managed narrow-gauge railroad connected the isolated Broad Top Mountain coal field with the Pennsylvania Railroad at Mount Union. With a decline in the hauling of coal, service ended in 1956. Nick Kovalchick, president of the Kovalchick Salvage Company of Indiana, Pennsylvania, purchased the railroad and reopened a portion of it as a tourist line in 1960. Through vintage photographs, East Broad Top Railroad showcases the steam locomotives, rolling stock, and railroad yard at Rockhill Furnace, which is the most historic railroad yard in North America.

Traveling the Pennsylvania Railroad: Photographs of William H. Rau

Eileen E. Drelick, John C. Van Horne

In the 1890s Philadelphia's preeminent photographer, William H. Rau, was commissioned to take more than 450 photographs along the routes of the Pennsylvania Railroad in order to promote travel on the railway to the general public. Known as "the standard railroad of the world," the PRR was the largest rail system in the East and linked metropolitan New York and Philadelphia to Pittsburgh and such industrial cities of the Midwest as Chicago and St. Louis.

Using a mammoth view camera that made 18-inch by 22-inch glass negatives, Rau produced a spectacular series of images for the railroad's promotional use. The remarkably detailed and texturally rich albumen prints, on deposit at The Library Company of Philadelphia, display a harmony between the railroad and the natural and industrial landscapes through which the line passed. The collection includes striking views not just of railcars, tracks, and stations but also of cities and towns, bridges, ferry boats, rivers, canals, factories, residences, and hotels, mostly in Pennsylvania, but with some views also of New York, New Jersey, and Maryland.

This oversize volume reproduces almost 100 of the photographs, carefully selected for their historical and artistic significance, as full-page quadtone images, capturing the impact of the originals as closely as possible. The photographs are arranged in geographical order along the various branches of the PRR, and each photograph is accompanied by a descriptive caption provided by PRR expert James J. D. Lynch, Jr. In the three essays that complement the photographs, Kenneth Finkel details Rau's career and early commercial photography, Mary Panzer places Rau and his PRR photographs in the context of the history of American landscape photography, and John R. Stilgoe discusses the advent of railroad advertising photography and its role in shaping perceptions of the American landscape.

Trolleys of Pennsylvania (America Through Time)

Kenneth C. Springirth

Trolleys of Pennsylvania is a photographic essay covering trolley car systems in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania had more operating trolley companies than any other state in the United States. Fairmount Park in Philadelphia was the first park in the world to have a trolley car line located entirely within the park. Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was the smallest city in the United States to place in service new modern Presidents' Conference Committee cars. Until Philadelphia's Route 62 (Darby-Yeadon) was combined with Route 13 in 1971, Route 62 was the shortest trolley car line in the United States. This book provides an insight into a variety of trolley car lines that have contributed to Trolleys of Pennsylvania.

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