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Benin City

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Mikonos Hotel and Suite
Mikonos Hotel and Suite - dream vacation

100, Benin-Auchi Road, Aduwawa.Benin City

Rims Hotel
Rims Hotel - dream vacation

2, Edisonwan streetBenin City

Lord\'s Vineyard Hotel Complex
Lord\'s Vineyard Hotel Complex - dream vacation

No 72 Community Road, OgharekiBenin City

Olomo Beach Resort
Olomo Beach Resort - dream vacation

Uhonmora/Sabogida OraBenin City

Channel O Hotel
Channel O Hotel - dream vacation

26 Benin-Lagos Express WayBenin City

Oghara Hotel
Oghara Hotel - dream vacation

40,Oghara Hotel,Ajagbodudu RoadBenin City

Best Exclusive Lodge
Best Exclusive Lodge - dream vacation

2, Ebhojaiye street, Old Benin-Agbor road.Benin City

Thywill Hotel and Suite Limited
Thywill Hotel and Suite Limited - dream vacation

Akhibi House, 16 Egan Street, After Opoji Junction, Along Benin/Auchi ExpresswayBenin City

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Not to be confused with Benin.

Benin City is one of the oldest cities in Nigeria, dating back to pre-colonial times. It boasts one of the most advanced and organised kingdoms before the arrival of the British. The city used to be the capital of the old Bendel state until this was divided into Edo and Delta. Benin City is the capital of Edo state.

Understand

The original people and founders of the Benin Empire, the Edo people, were initially ruled by the Ogiso (Kings of the Sky) dynasty who called their land Igodomigodo. The rulers or kings were commonly known as Ogiso. Benin grew rich during the 16th and 17th centuries due to trade within southern Nigeria, as well as through trade with Europeans, mostly in pepper and ivory. In the early 16th century the Oba sent an ambassador to Lisbon, and the King of Portugal sent Christian missionaries to Benin. Many Portuguese loan words can still be found today in the languages of the area.

On 17 February 1897, Benin City fell to the British in the "Punitive Expedition", in which a 1,200-strong British force conquered and razed the city after all but two men from a previous British expeditionary force were killed. Until then, Benin City had been known for its impressive architecture, including its city walls that were said to be four times as long as the Great Wall of China, but these were all destroyed by the British in the 1897 expedition. The Benin Bronzes, portrait figures, busts and groups created in iron, carved ivory, and especially in brass, were taken from the city by the British and are displayed in various British museums. Some of the bronzes were auctioned off to compensate for the expenses incurred during the invasion of the city. Various appeals have been made to the British government to return such artifacts. The capture of Benin paved the way for British military occupation and the merging of later regional British conquests into the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria.

Since Nigeria's independence from British rule in 1960, Benin City has been a regional capital.

Get in

1 Benin Airport is a small airport with a few daily flights from Lagos and Abuja, with Arik Air offering the most flights.

Benin is known for its road transport, so a visitor can get to the city from almost any city in the country. From Lagos it takes about 4 hours to get to Benin, but it's best to travel during the day because the bad roads make the journey a lot longer and stressful. From Port Harcourt, its about 4 hours 30 minutes to Benin. The journey from Port Harcourt is a lot easier because there are better roads on that stretch. The roads in Benin City are not very good and traffic regulations are rarely enforced in this busy city, so hold-ups and traffic jams are common in some parts of the city.

Get around

Getting around in Benin isn't too difficult. The roads are fairly well constructed, and the city is well linked and networked. If you come in by air, there are taxis at the airport to take you probably anywhere you wish to go for an affordable price. And if you come in by road and are taken to the terminal of the transport service, you will also find taxis ready to take you anywhere. Taxis and buses are supposed to be painted red or rather wine on their body and yellow on the roof. But there are some buses and taxis that don't obey that code.

Most roads lead to the ring road, so to get to some places, you actually have to get to the ring road and then take another bus or cab to your destination. Moving from one part of town to another is usually done by bus but on some routes, you can also take a taxi. There are no standard bus stops in the city so generally when you are in a commercial vehicle that has reached your destination, you would alert the driver by saying "stop" or "drop", and then he would come to a halt. Don't hesitate to say this as the driver will certainly take you past your destination if you don't.

The city has a very active night life, and getting around at night time is pretty much the same as getting around during the day time, except that some routes become more dangerous at night time, so take precautions.

Apart from buses and taxis you can also get around the city with motor bikes. But the state has a law that bans the movement of commercial motor bikes between 7PM and 6AM.

See

  • 1 Benin City National Museum (King's Square,CBD). While much of the cultural heritage of Benin has been looted and now resides in British Museum, there are still several interesting artifacts displayed, reflecting the rich history and culture of the Edo people and Benin kingdom.

Do

Buy

Suya (Nigerian equivalent of a barbecue) but much better!

Eat

Edo people love pounded yam and obgolo soup (draw soup).

Drink

Palm wine from local palm wine tappers. Bottled palm wine does not taste as good.

Sleep

  • 1 Randekhi Royal Hotel, 6 Uhenuyi Street (off Ihama Road), ☎ +234 52 895036.
  • 2 Kenbrill Hyatt Hotel, 10 Agbonrofo Street (Off Ettete Street).
  • Hotel Elegance.

Go next

  • Ibadan
  • Lagos
  • Nnewi
  • Warri


Benin: The City of Blood (1897)

Sir Reginald Bacon

Admiral Sir Reginald Hugh Spencer Bacon (1863 –1947) was an officer in the Royal Navy noted for his technical abilities. He was described by the First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir Jacky Fisher, as the man "acknowledged to be the cleverest officer in the Navy". In 1897 he served as a member of the British punitive expedition to Benin, and on his return from active service wrote the book Benin, the City of Blood (1897), describing the campaign. The Benin Expedition of 1897 was a punitive expedition by a United Kingdom force of 1,200 under Admiral Sir Harry Rawson in response to the defeat of a previous British-led invasion force under Acting Consul General James Philips (which had left all but two men dead).Bacon has made his story brief, and at the same time has avoided baldness. Almost at once the reader is put in possession of the facts, drawn irresistibly into line with the expedition, and compelled to follow it through all its hardships and dangers. Scarcely ever has such a complement of men been got together from so great a distance and furnished so completely in so short a time. Nor has a British force had such a task set them as the march along the bush-path to Ologo. The author gives the picture in a few words: “Imagine a country 25¢ a square miles, one mass of forest, without one break, except a small clearing here or there for a village and its compound. Imagine this forest stocked with trees: some 200 feet high, with a dense foliage overhead, and interspersed between these monster products of vegetable growth smaller trees to fill up the gaps. Imagine between all these trees an undergrowth of rubber shrubs, palms, and creepers, so thick that the eye could never penetrate more than twenty yards, and often not even ten. Imagine the fact that you might even walk for an hour without seeing the sun overhead, and only at times get a glimmer of a sunbeam across the path, and you have an elementary conception of the bush country of Benin.” The path through all this was just broad enough for one man to walk in comfort, able only to touch the bush each side with outstretched arms. All was grand overhead, while from the ground came the rank smell of decaying vegetable matter, charged with the germs of malaria. Fighting under such circumstances gives overwhelming advantages to the enemy, but nevertheless Benin was finally taken with but little loss of life. It is difficult in a short space to give any idea of the striking way Commander Bacon brings the horrors and trials of the campaign vividly before the reader; or to give even a vague notion of the loathsome practice of Ju-Ju, or the terrible picture of slaughter and sacrifice Benin presented when it was at last reached. This books should be read not only by those who care for adventure, but also by those who care for history. England has spilt much blood in the doing of unpleasant yet necessary deeds with varying degrees of success; but it is for the reader to determine whether "purging of this 'pest-house,' this decomposing ghastly cesspool, in so summary a fashion" was justified or merely misguided imperialism.This book originally published in 1897 has been reformatted for the Kindle and may contain an occasional defect from the original publication or from the reformatting.

Journey to the Motherland From San Francisco to Benin City: By Larry Ukali Johnson-Redd

Larry U. Johnson-Redd

“Journey To The Motherland – From San Francisco to Benin City”Novel by Larry Ukali Johnson-ReddReview By Kola Thomas San Francisco, CA This autobiographical “Journey To The Motherland” is a 170-page novel, but I read it in less than two days. Reading this book was an invocation of the nostalgia to be “at home right now.”This book is written in a style that helps the reader to be transported to Africa and be actively engaged in the dynamic and evolving events of the moment as they unfold. One could not help but follow the “Journey...” and soak in the moments. Perhaps being a Yoruba (born in Nigeria), familiar with the local terrain and socio-cultural manifestations and political landscape of Nigeria; and living in the Bay Area for over twenty-five years – well I travel home periodically - I am able to understand the book better. However, this is a book about a wonderful experience in Africa. One thing that is clear throughout the book is a commitment by the author Ukali Johnson-Redd, to increasing empowerment for African people all over the world. It behooves any one contemplating a visit to any part of Africa; to read “Journey...” A great many brothers and sisters go to Africa, without preparation or some form of orientation. They then experience cultural shock on arrival - shock at the mass of black people taking care of business; shock at the unparalleled and unqualified show of hospitality displayed by the hosts; shock at the high level of intellectual capacity and scholarship; shock at the fact that people are unfazed at whether or not utilities work; and shock at the fact that the urban and rural areas are just as any you will find in the so-called civilized western cities. I could not help but be thankfully amazed at how Brother Ukali has assimilated the local lingo and nuances to a “T.” Talk about “invigilation…” for proctoring a student test - page 124; and dispensing “dongoyaro” – a traditional herbal extract - as the preferred medication for malaria - page 144 - that follows age-long African understanding of traditional therapy – and which Western medicine refuses to celebrate. Perhaps Ukali needs to consider sharing his experience at medical colleges here in the United States.“Journey to Motherland…” is recommended and a definite must read by every one who wishes to get a better understanding of Africa and African ways, its indubitable and welcoming hospitality, and its great culture, educational environment.Kola Akintola-Thomas is CEO of African Global Institute-USA based in San Francisco, California. He can be reached at africanglobal@yahoo.com

City Maps Benin City Nigeria

James McFee

City Maps Benin City Nigeria is an easy to use small pocket book filled with all you need for your stay in the big city. Attractions, pubs, bars, restaurants, museums, convenience stores, clothing stores, shopping centers, marketplaces, police, emergency facilities are only some of the places you will find in this map. This collection of maps is up to date with the latest developments of the city as of 2017. We hope you let this map be part of yet another fun Benin City adventure :)

Benin (Other Places Travel Guide)

Michael Bolin

Fully updated second edition with a portion of all proceeds going back into the local communities of Benin.

Benin is a country of wonder and mystery, fitting all levels of adventure and comfort. Its unique mixture of culture, history, geography, and wildlife provides the ultimate West African experience. From thrilling zemidjan moped rides to spotting hippos from dugout canoes, traveling across Benin will surely stimulate visitors’ senses and broaden their horizons.

The authors each served two years in Benin as Peace Corps Volunteers. During their time in Benin, they lived, worked, and played while experiencing everything the country had to offer. This book is a result of their first-hand knowledge and from the contributions of countless locals, each with their own specialty and unique insight. To see the real Benin and to travel like a local, this book is a must.

City Maps Nikki Benin

James McFee

City Maps Nikki Benin is an easy to use small pocket book filled with all you need for your stay in the big city. Attractions, pubs, bars, restaurants, museums, convenience stores, clothing stores, shopping centers, marketplaces, police, emergency facilities are only some of the places you will find in this map. This collection of maps is up to date with the latest developments of the city as of 2017. We hope you let this map be part of yet another fun Nikki adventure :)

City Maps Djougou Benin

James McFee

City Maps Djougou Benin is an easy to use small pocket book filled with all you need for your stay in the big city. Attractions, pubs, bars, restaurants, museums, convenience stores, clothing stores, shopping centers, marketplaces, police, emergency facilities are only some of the places you will find in this map. This collection of maps is up to date with the latest developments of the city as of 2017. We hope you let this map be part of yet another fun Djougou adventure :)

City Maps Cotonou Benin

James McFee

City Maps Cotonou Benin is an easy to use small pocket book filled with all you need for your stay in the big city. Attractions, pubs, bars, restaurants, museums, convenience stores, clothing stores, shopping centers, marketplaces, police, emergency facilities are only some of the places you will find in this map. This collection of maps is up to date with the latest developments of the city as of 2017. We hope you let this map be part of yet another fun Cotonou adventure :)

City Maps Abomey Benin

James McFee

City Maps Abomey Benin is an easy to use small pocket book filled with all you need for your stay in the big city. Attractions, pubs, bars, restaurants, museums, convenience stores, clothing stores, shopping centers, marketplaces, police, emergency facilities are only some of the places you will find in this map. This collection of maps is up to date with the latest developments of the city as of 2017. We hope you let this map be part of yet another fun Abomey adventure :)

City Maps Natitingou Benin

James McFee

City Maps Natitingou Benin is an easy to use small pocket book filled with all you need for your stay in the big city. Attractions, pubs, bars, restaurants, museums, convenience stores, clothing stores, shopping centers, marketplaces, police, emergency facilities are only some of the places you will find in this map. This collection of maps is up to date with the latest developments of the city as of 2017. We hope you let this map be part of yet another fun Natitingou adventure :)

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